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GigMerge Launch Party Recap: December 5th, 2019! (THROWBACK)

Check out these videos from our Launch Party on December 5th! 
We have the short video that gives a recap of the event and the longer video that shows artists’ performances. 

Videos by Chris Daley

Subscribe to our YouTube channel to stay up-to-date!

Event Pictures

Photos by Arden Maureen
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Want to Know the EXACT Steps to Move Your Career Forward?

Have you felt confused in not knowing what to do to move your career or business forward?

Our Artist/Business Plan of Action can provide you with a sense of guidance and direction.

 

What You Receive:

 

1. We provide you with a Step-by-Step Plan of Action that outlines the steps that you need to take moving forward. We also provide you with necessary tools, apps, resources, and relevant video tutorials and articles to make sure you have the guidance you need. Whether it is the steps you need to take to release your next project or the process you need to follow in order to rebrand yourself:

We give you the steps, all you need to do is follow.

Plan of Action

 

2. We give you an analysis of who your target audience is and how your audience perceives your brand. Knowing this is important to keep in mind whenever you are posting on social media, deciding what events to attend, determining what to wear, etc.

 

Target Audience

 

3. We provide you with a list of Content and Marketing Ideas that can help you continue to brand yourself. Whether it is different types of social media posts or creative event ideas, we provide you with some options to consider.

 

4. Lastly, we check your artist or business name availability in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

  • Why This is Important: We do not want you to build a brand on a name that you cannot use or that could easily be confused with something else. If your name is available, we provide you with contact information for the Trademark attorney who filed GigMerge’s trademark. Below is a short video explaining more of why this process is important:

If Interested in This Service, Fill Out the Form Below!

We will email you your report in 3-4 business days.
If we have any questions, we will reach out to you via email.


Submit
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BLACK FRIDAY SPECIAL: $5 Instagram Posts + 20% Off In Store

Use code: “B1ackG1g“ at checkout for 20% off in store (except for items already on sale)

Offer expires on Monday, November 30, 2020 at 11:59pm EST

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A&R Background of GigMerge CEO

In this video, Tiffany Johnson, the CEO of GigMerge, discusses her college background,
her music industry career, her entrepreneurial journey, and more.

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Check Out Our Interview with TJ of “What’s The Biz!”

“In this episode, you’ll discover the ins and outs of GigMerge and how they support local artists and the #DYT! Also learn about the WORK that Tiffany put in while working as an A&R (getting opportunities to visit Def Jam, Atlantic, Universal, Roc Nation, Warner, and Sony🤯).”

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We Have a Music Industry Podcast Playlist on Spotify!

ARTISTS: We created a Music Industry Podcast Playlist on Spotify. This playlist will be some our favorite podcast episodes from music industry professionals.

We will be regularly adding to this playlist as we are always listening to podcasts.
Be sure to like/follow the playlist to stay up to date!

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Stay Warm in a GigMerge Hoodie!

It’s fall – You can never have too many hoodies.
We have got you covered!

Check out the hoodies we have in our store below and order yours today!

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5 Ways to Pitch Your Music for Placement

By Joey Stuckey

Okay, now you are ready to pitch your music. So how do you figure out who to speak to and if they need the kind of music you make?

First, remember that no matter what kind of music you make, there is a project looking for your music! (Of course, if you do a more niche genre, like Klezmer, you will have a smaller group of supervisors looking for your music. If you do the Pop genre – while there is more of an audience for that, there is also a lot more competition.)

So what’s next? Below are 5 Ways to Pitch Your Music for Placement.


1. Keep a notebook or something near you when you watch TV shows, movies or play video games
.
Pay attention to the kind of music that is being used – whether it is a song being played on a juke box in a bar scene, the theme song of your favorite show, or the music they use for the fight scene in your favorite action flick or video game. Listen to the music and see if anything you have created would work in a similar situation. Make a note of the show, commercial, or video game, what scene it was and anything else that might be relevant to the music used.


2. Once you find a show or game where your song would work, find out who the
music supervisor is and look that person up on IMDB.
Sometimes you can find that person’s contact info on IMDB or LinkedIn or an old fashion Google search. However, if not, you can buy film and TV directories that list music supervisors.


3
. Send a short email to the music supervisor saying you noticed they used music in a scene and you have similar music that may work.
(Make sure to reference the specific scene.) Ask would they mind if you sent them a sample of that track.
The supervisor will tell you if they want you to attach an MP3, send a link to download, send a CD in the
mail, or if they would prefer a streaming link.


4. Be professional
.
Don’t pester the supervisor or check in to see what they thought. They will reach out to you if there is a good fit for a project. Also, don’t be afraid to send them different music later on – usually a month or two after your last email – that you think might work on a different project.

Always be polite and don’t take offense if what you submit isn’t right for what they are working on right now. Usually if they like the music but don’t have an immediate need for it, they will hang on to it and remember you later if an appropriate opportunity comes up.
Be sure to thank them for their time!


5. When you can go to music conferences where music supervisors are speaking, often you will get an

opportunity to hand them your music.
Most of the time, they are open to this, but not always. If they don’t want to take your music, it isn’t about you or them not liking your music – it just means they don’t have the time or space to take any music right then.

You can also pay to be part of “pitch sessions.” A lot of groups and organizations offer this like NARIP. When you can afford both the time and money, you should be wherever music is being made or talked
about. It is all about networking!

And that’s it!

With hard work, a professional attitude, consistent effort, and patience, you can get your music in TV, film, videogames and more.

So, go out there and make a splash!

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How to Prepare Your Music for Synch Licensing

It’s All About The Synch (Part 2) – By Joey Stuckey

Last time, we learned about what synch licensing is and what synch licensing is not. In this article, we’ll explore how to get your music into film, TV, and other kinds of placements.

If you haven’t read the first article and aren’t sure what synch licensing is, check out part 1 of the article HERE.

Now, I will provide you with your synch checklist, which includes:

  • How to start the process of getting your music placed
    And
  • How to find and communicate with those magical guardians of synch:  the music supervisors.


Before you are ready to pitch your music, you’ll need to do a few things:

 

  1. Make sure you have a professionally recorded and mixed song.

This doesn’t mean that you can’t do it yourself at home on your laptop. It just means that you are honest about what you can do yourself and where you need a pro to step in to take your music to the next level. Rough demos are NOT what is needed here. While that might be fine to pitch to a manager, traditional music publisher or booking agent – in the world of synch, you need to have a FINISHED product.

Typically, electronic music like EDM and some hip-hop can be done well at home. Even recording vocals and guitars can work well with a home studio. Home studios are not usually up to the challenge when recording drums, strings, and horns. Sometimes, depending on the genre, a slick production like Katy Perry isn’t what you want. Sometimes lo-fi is what the genre calls for so you’ll need to truly understand your music and work at home or in a pro studio accordingly.

Don’t be afraid to admit when you are in over your head. You need to make sure you are getting a great performance from all the musicians and sometimes, your best friend that plays sax isn’t the right choice for the session—you might have to pay for a guy that is a master player. Similarly, you might not be ready to mix your song yourself and might need to hire someone that just mixes records. This can be expensive, but in the end -will be worth it.

Now, I am not suggesting that you spend money outside your means. You need to come up with a budget and stick with it. You don’t want to lose a lot of money and have that negatively impact your career long term. Just do the best you can with the resources you have.

There are a lot of ways to get free recording time and/or mixes by working with colleges or universities that have recording programs. Their students need to learn and are looking for bands and artists to work with and this can be a great way to up your game without spending your money.

 

  1. You need a professionally mastered project.

For demos, the online mastering services that use an algorithm and are automated is fine, but this is not sufficient in the world of sync licensing. You’ll need to go to a real person that understands mastering. It isn’t about just making the music loud. Mastering is an entirely misunderstood process that I can’t fully address here. Suffice it to say, you need it done by a pro, not a program.

Mastering ranges from $25 per song to $400 an hour, but I promise you – if you use a real mastering engineer, your song will be much better for it.

 

  1. It’s all about the metadata!!!

What is metadata? It is all the info you need to provide so that busy people in the music biz have critical info about who you are and about the song – at the click of a mouse.

A couple of important things about metadata:


First, MP3’s and AIFF files are the best candidates for music file types that can hold metadata. You’ll want to have both available when pitching your music for synch placement.

You’ll want the MP3’s for the initial submission and the AIFF when your music is accepted for placement.


Next, you’ll want to include the following (at a minimum) when tagging your files with metadata.

  • Song title
  • Artist/band name
  • Record label (if any)
  • Publisher (if any)
  • Complete name of the songwriter(s)
  • Date of copyright
  • Genre
  • Mood (happy, sad, etc)
  • Tempo or BPM
  • Mix version (we’ll get more into what this means in just a sec.)
  • Are you a one stop? This means do you own all the rights to your music. This is important so the music supervisor knows if you can make all the deals for your music. This can be a deal-breaker because if there are too many people with rights to a song, it can take more time than the music supervisor has to clear all rights and they’ll move on to the next artist that is a one stop -even if they like your song better. It is really about who has all their ducks in a row and is professional when it comes to synch –  moreso than who has the best song.

     

  1. Have lots of extra versions or alternate mixes of each song.

So you should have available not only the main or “full mix” of each song –the one you would release to radio or on your album/EP – but you should also have an instrumental version without vocals. If you produce instrumental music, be sure to have a version without the melody.

You should also do other versions that make sense, for example, an acoustic version with just guitar or piano. For my most recent song “You Know My Name,” I did a version with and without horns, another version just instrumental, and another version without the horns and lead guitar. This version also only used the room mics on the drum kit instead of the usual thing I do with drums which is to have both close mics and room mics combined. This gave the track a more alt-rock vibe and less of the southern blues vibe that the track had before.

You should also make sure to have stems available as well as the raw multi-tracks for each song. You might ask, why do you want stems if I can deliver the raw multi-tracks. Well, the stems have all the E-Q, volume, compression and other effects that you used in the full mix. You are providing stereo mixes of each grouping of like instruments and in this way, the synch gurus can quickly re-assemble your mix and make edits.

 

  1. You should have all your files available for download via link by a service like DropBox.

This allows you to provide any or all of your files and mixes at a moment’s notice, wherever you are. I can’t stress enough that timing is everything and music supervisors are busier than you can imagine. They need what they need at a moment’s notice.

 

Okay, now you are ready to pitch your music so how do you figure out who to speak to and if they need the kind of music you make? We will cover that in our next article, stay tuned!

 

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We are now offering Business Features!

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